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  • Start your plastic product design off in the right direction!

    As a material, plastic offers a number of possibilities, but there are at least as many pitfalls too. Optimism and rashness can lead to a situation where you have at your warehouse a couple of thousand assembled and packed items that – for one reason or another – end up being scrapped. Or maybe the

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  • Plastic material classification from the Product Designer perspective

    The enormous variety of different plastic grades and their characteristics is confusing. Which one of the cryptic abbreviations is the right pick for your application? Here is a look at the offering from the Product Designer perspective.  What do we expect from the end product and therefore also

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  • PA6/PA66 - properties, experiences and useful links

    The members of the polyamide family are coded with cryptic extensions like 6, 11, 12, 66, 46 and 69. The numbers describe the type and number of polymer chains in their chemical structure. This approach, the normal practice in the industry, is not very user-friendly from the product designer’s

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  • POM - properties, experiences and useful links

    POM is known for its good fatigue/creep resistance, low friction and good performance in cold temperature. But the key characteristics of POM have been posted in several web pages already, so instead of posting them yet again I rather recommend a few good links. As a source of information for the

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  • What is plasticprop material sample?

    This short video demonstrates the functions and benefits of Plasticprop Essentials material samples. The collection of plastic samples was set off by my daily need to assess and compare different plastics in practise. The Plasticprop Essentials contains 20 plastic samples with different

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  • Plastic product Impact resistance - what can you do with the geometry

    Skilled boxers have good impact resistance. They can absorb the energy of impacts with their whole body, not just one part of it, nose for instance. The same principle applies not only to material toughness, but to mechanics as well: 1: Try to distribute the energy of impacts to the whole

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  • Impact Resistance - tips for plastic material selection

    Either I am dumb or the Izod and Charpy values expressed on the datasheets are confusing, but I have never been able to utilize them in practise. Apart from the units being sometimes in J/m and sometimes in J/m2, the tests are conducted in circumstances that are not particularly realistic in terms

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  • Plastic products and Impact Resistance

    When my wife dropped her old cell phone from the balcony to the concrete-paved yard, the phone took a few bounces and distributed itself then in several pieces around it. That was it, I thought. But as we collected the pieces, snapped them together and turned the power on, the phone worked

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  • Toughness - an unutilized material property

    If you throw a rubber bone to a dog, it will try its best to rip it apart. But no matter how much energy the dog consumes, the bone survives the treatment. This is because it is made of tough material. In physical terms, toughness is the ability of the material to absorb energy before rupturing.

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  • Lego #1 in toys

    It was today announced that Lego is the #1 toy manufacturer in the world! The company is a great example of how plastic, good design and high quality can be turned into great products, joy and commercial success. I watched Lego related videos on Youtube and picked the three most interesting ones

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  • How strong is plastic really?

    “Modern polymers are stronger than steel”. This is a frequent article claim. Is it true?

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  • How to prevent stress cracking from breaking your product?

    Within the field of plastic products, stress cracking is a common, if not the most common, quality problem. Its consequences are often severe since problems tend to occur only after the products have already hit the market. In most cases, however, customer dissatisfaction could be avoided in the

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  • Stress-strain-curve - Material properties at a glance

    Stress-strain curve is my favorite graph since it offers so much valuable information on any plastic material at a glance. Unlike many other graphs, stress-strain-curves are also easy to find. The tensile test for drawing the curve is presented in this video.

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  • Tensile or Flexural Strength/Stiffness – is there really a difference?

    I have often found myself in a situation where a datasheet states material strength and modulus as flexural or tensile; sometimes both but at other times only one of them.    

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  • What does front-end mean in plastic product design?

    I’ve been involved in some rather catastrophic design projects during my working history, and more often than not I have had myself to blame. The most memorable cases have sprung from a desperate attempt to develop something completely new within a scheduled and budgeted NPD project. Indeed,

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  • What makes some designers so successful?

      Does it feel like it is always the same people in the organization who come up with great solutions and ideas worth of further development? Why is that? Are these ”innovators” simply smarter than everyone else? I’ve had the privilege of working with some of them. The technical understanding

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  • The technical questions every plastic product designer should be able to answer

    “This is beautiful! It must be good design.” Product design is often evaluated from the aesthetic perspective. Visual appearance can make a product a commercial success or a failure, but it is still only one part of the bigger picture. For physical products, positive user experience requires

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  • The Brazuca

    Adidas has been the FIFA World Cup Official Match Ball supplier since 1970. In the 2014 World Cup the ball is called Brazuca, which means someone born in Brazil or something made in Brazil, but is also used to describe national pride in anything with a Brazilian nature. Incidentally, the Brazuca of

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